The FAQs About Career Exploration

FAQs Sign
FAQs on Doing a Job Search . . .

  1. What ‘tools’ are available for doing this research?
  2. What kinds of questions will I be finding the answers to?
  3. What if I can’t find an occupational group that I really like?
  4. What if I’d like to work in more than one occupation or field?
  5. Why should I do all this research?
  6. What if my personal talents seem to fit an occupational category that I don’t really want to work in?
  7. Help! I find all this research on occupational groups too overwhelming, what can I do?
  8. All this information I’m coming across, is getting out of control, how do I remember it all?
  9. I have talent that gives people a lot of pleasure and I love doing it. But it doesn’t earn me much money. Why can’t I make a living with my talent?




FAQ #1: What ‘tools’ are available for doing this research?


You will be working a lot off this site. You will be using links that few people are aware of, to go to Big Government and Institutional Databases to do your Occupational Research online.

Later, in Step 3, you’ll be using books, newspapers, magazines, your computer, talking to people, observing people at work on the job, even volunteering your time if you want to.

Remember, at this point, in Step 2, you are looking at Broad Occupational Target Areas. You don’t need to pinpoint the ‘Specific Job’ title yet.

FAQ #2: What kinds of questions will you be getting the answers to?

There is a list of 50 Basic Questions called THE BASIC QUESTIONS CHECKLIST that you can look at, to give you an idea of the kinds of questions that you’ll be researching and finding the answers to. These questions are suggestions that you can choose from to help guide your research according to what is useful and relevant for you.

FAQ #3: What if I can’t find an occupational group that I really like?

You’d be surprised how many people don’t know what they want, especially, if they are not experienced with life or haven’t tried different types of work. The main thing is to pick something you think you’ll like. You can always change your mind later. If you never try anything, you’ll never get to know what you like and don’t like. Your preferences will develop with time and experience, as you get to know yourself.

FAQ #4: What if I’d like to work in more than one occupation or field?

That’s great, now you have more to choose from. You can have more than one suitable job that meets your personal needs and requirements. You can even volunteer in one while you work in the other.

FAQ #5: I’d just like to be a receptionist and earn some money. Why should I do all this research?

True, you can find the same job in many different “Fields of Work”. Receptionists, for example, can be found in all “Fields”. So what difference does it make where you do the job?

Well, if you get a job on reception in a Car Dealership, and your heart is with animals, you are not in the best fit for you. You may end up thinking “this job is a grind” and hating every minute of being surrounded by cars and people who talk cars all the time. Your only joy in life is your dog, and you can’t wait to get home to him.

If you know that you need to work around animals, then, with the same effort, you could just as easily get a receptionist position in a Veterinary Clinic or an animal hospital, an Animal Charity, the Humane Society, a Zoo, or a school that trains Veterinary Assistants, where you are with people who have similar interests. There you will feel like you fit in, like you belong, and like you are making a real contribution. Ah, how much better that feels!

So where you get the job is just as important as what kind of job it is, and who you will interact with on the job. First find the “Field” that you love. That’s your home base. Then pick a job in that “Field”.


FAQ #6: What if my personal talents fit an occupational category that I don’t really want to work in?


The deciding factor is what you’d like to work at and what you are interested in. You can have a talent in an area like art, or fixing cars, but not really have any driving motivation to pursue it as a job. It’s just a hobby that you are good at. You need to be looking for something that you’d like to work at, and also have the personal characteristics – from your self-assessment – to fit it.

If you don’t love it, that’s a red flag. Focus on finding work that you can enjoy doing and fall in love with.

FAQ #7: Help! I find all this research on occupational groups too overwhelming, what can I do?

Chances are you are trying to do too much in too short a time. If you don’t try to rush through this process, you’ll find it easier to work through.

When you are looking at a particular area, try to imagine yourself in that field. Can you think of what you’d like to be doing? As you go through the categories, you’ll see titles of jobs you’ll wonder about. If you find a number of interesting titles in one field, then that field or occupation may be the one you need to focus on. In other words, maybe you have found it already.

Remember, you can take your time and come back to your research whenever you feel ready. No one is rushing you. You can do career exploration at your own pace. Print out anything that you find interesting and keep it in a folder. Each time you come back to it, you’ll see how much you have actually accomplished. And things will start to fall into place. Just take it one step at a time.

FAQ #8: All this information I’m coming across, is getting out of control, how do I remember it all?

You don’t have to remember it all. You only have to find one area or field that you’d like to work in. Here are some hints on keeping organized. Get a folder for each occupation that you are researching and put the information you are collecting into it.

Here’s what to put in your folders:

  • Your thoughts and impressions after interviews about: the environment, the kind of people you saw there, their work style, how you felt about the work.
  • Keep records of all your interviews.
  • Take digital shots of job sites you visit, as reminders of what you saw.
  • If you made a special connection with anyone ask someone to take a picture of you and that person. Most people will be happy to do this, if they liked you. Keep that person’s name and title in your notes and on back of their photo.
  • Write out any questions that come to mind that you need to check out. These may be questions you can use in other interviews.
  • Keep notes on where to find things: web addresses, book titles, libraries you visited
  • Bookmark the best websites you visit on the internet.
  • Keep any info on all those you interview – better still – exchange business cards with them. You can create your own business cards using your word processor.
  • Note any names or leads you get from your research.


FAQS #9: I have talent that gives people a lot of pleasure and I love doing it. But it doesn’t earn me much money. Why can’t I make a living with my talent?


Good news – you have more of a chance of making money with your talent now, than at any other time in history. We have the internet, and YouTube and Social Media like Facebook Fan pages and Twitter that will get you known.

Many famous artists and scientists with incredible talent, in the past, were never recognized in their time. It took centuries for them to become known. But they believed in their gift and never gave up. They focused on perfecting the gift and learning from their talent as they developed it. They treasured it and enjoyed it for what it was, and they left a legacy for later generations. That is a huge contribution to make to the world, which few have the opportunity to achieve. You do, if you choose to use your talent.

The ‘overnight’ successes in Hollywood, if you follow their stories, were many years in the making. They too believed in their talent and never gave up. Persistence and belief in themselves paid off.

Enjoy your talent and share it. It’s your gift to the world. Count yourself lucky to have it.

GUIDING COMMENT:
After reading these FAQS, take a quick look at the Major Occupational Groups, and become familiar with the names of the jobs. This will give you the right words to use to do your research.



This Link Will Take You Through Steps 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the Program


Links to Step 1 - The 5 Career Tests on This Site

Step 1 - Discovering Who You Are
Links to Step 2 - Career Exploration

Step 2 - Exploring Your Career Options
Links to Step 3 - Getting into the Nitty Gritty

Step 3 - Doing the Research For Your Dream Job
Links to Step 4 - Taking Care of Your Career

Step 4 - Managing Your Career - Doing Career Planning
Are you wondering: "What Career is Best for Me?"




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